Five key recommendations for the implementation of Hospital Electronic Prescribing and Medicines Administration systems in Scotland

Kathrin Cresswell, Ann Slee, Aziz Sheikh

Abstract


NHS Scotland is about to embark on the implementation of Hospital Electronic Prescribing and Medicines Administration (HEPMA) systems. There are a number of risks associated with such ventures, thus drawing on existing experiences from other settings is crucial in informing deployment.

Drawing on our previous and ongoing work in English settings as well as the international literature, we reflect on key lessons that NHS Scotland may wish to consider in going forward. These deliberations include recommendations surrounding key aspects of deployment strategy surrounding: 1) the way central coordination should be conceptualised, 2) how flexibility in can be ensured, 3) paying attention to optimising systems from the outset, 4) how expertise should be developed and centrally shared, and 5) ways in which learning from experience can be maximised.

Our five recommendations will, we hope, provide a starting point for the strategic deliberations of policy makers. Throughout this journey, it is important to view the deployment of HEPMA as part of a wider strategic goal of creating integrated digital infrastructures across Scotland.

Keywords


hospital electronic prescribing and medicines administration, implementation

Full Text:

PDF HTML

References


Black AD, Car J, Pagliari C, et al. The impact of eHealth on the quality and safety of health care: a systematic overview. PLoS Med 2011;8(1):e1000387.

Cresswell KM, Sheikh A. Health information technology in hospitals: current issues and future trends. Future Hospital Journal 2015;2:50-56.

Jha AK, Doolan D, Grandt D, Scott T, Bates DW. The use of health information technology in seven nations. International Journal of Medical Informatics 2008;77(12):848-54.

eHealth Strategy 2014-2017. Available from: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2015/03/5705/6 (last accessed: 17/05/16).

Sheikh A, Cornford T, Barber N, et al. Implementation and adoption of nationwide electronic health records in secondary care in England: final qualitative results from prospective national evaluation in “early adopter” hospitals. BMJ 2011;343.

Cresswell KM, Bates DW, Williams R, et al. Evaluation of medium-term consequences of implementing commercial computerized physician order entry and clinical decision support prescribing systems in two ‘early adopter’ hospitals. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 2014;21(e2):e194-202.

Cresswell K, Coleman J, Slee A, Morrison Z, Sheikh A. A toolkit to support the implementation of electronic prescribing systems into UK hospitals: preliminary recommendations. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 2014;107(1):8-13.

Cresswell K, Bates D, Sheikh A. Six ways for governments to get value from health information technology. The Lancet (in press).

Robertson A, Cresswell K, Takian A, et al. Implementation and adoption of nationwide electronic health records in secondary care in England: qualitative analysis of interim results from a prospective national evaluation. BMJ 2010;341:c4564.

Berg M. Implementing information systems in health care organizations: myths and challenges. International Journal of Medical Informatics 2001;64(2):143-56.

Ash JS, Berg M, Coiera E. Some unintended consequences of information technology in health care: the nature of patient care information system-related errors. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 2004;11(2):104-12.

Ferneley EH, Sobreperez P. Resist, comply or workaround? An examination of different facets of user engagement with information systems. European Journal of Information Systems 2006;15(4):345-56.

Hendy J, Reeves BC, Fulop N, Hutchings A, Masseria C. Challenges to implementing the national programme for information technology (NPfIT): a qualitative study. BMJ 2005;331(7512):331-6.

Cresswell KM, Bates DW, Sheikh A. Ten key considerations for the successful implementation and adoption of large-scale health information technology. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 2013;20(e1):e9-13.

Catwell L, Sheikh A. Evaluating eHealth interventions: the need for continuous systemic evaluation. PLoS Med 2009;6(8):e1000126.

Cresswell KM, Bates DW, Sheikh A. Ten key considerations for the successful optimization of large-scale health information technology. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 2016:ocw037.

Cresswell KM, Mozaffar H, Lee L, Williams R, Sheikh A. Safety risks associated with the lack of integration and interfacing of hospital health information technologies: a qualitative study of hospital electronic prescribing systems in England. BMJ Quality & Safety 2016:bmjqs-2015.

Mantas J, Ammenwerth E, Demiris G, Hasman A, Haux R, Hersh W, Hovenga E, Lun KC, Marin H, Martin-Sanchez F, Wright G. Recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) on education in biomedical and health informatics-first revision. Acta Informatica Medica 2010;18(1):4.

Krist AH, Woolf SH. A vision for patient-centered health information systems. JAMA 2011;305(3):300-1.




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14236/jhi.v23i4.904

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


This is an open access journal, which means that all content is freely available without charge to the user or their institution. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles in this journal starting from Volume 21 without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author. This is in accordance with the BOAI definition of open accessFor permission regarding papers published in previous volumes, please contact us.

Privacy statement: The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.

Online ISSN 2058-4563 - Print ISSN 2058-4555. Published by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT